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Taiwan Tea Mi Xiang Bug Bitten Taiwanese Oolong Tea 300g loose leaves

jLteaco

販売価格 $44.00 通常価格 $48.40

配送料は購入手続き時に計算されます。

Hand-plucked Mi Xiang Bug Bitten Taiwanese Jade Oolong Tea Loose Leaves 

Item: Mi Xiang Bug Bitten Taiwanese Jade Oolong (Wu Long) Tea 

Pack size: 2 x 150 g +/- 5% (2 x 5.3 oz) loose leaves in 2 vacuum-sealed foil bags

Cultivar: TTES #13 

Features:

Mi Xiang Oolong, growing from a natural ecological management tea plantation, with intentional nonintervention, being bitten by leafhoppers, coordinating traditional Taiwanese heavy-fermented skill of tea-making, the natural tea leaves increase their individual sweet flavor. The liquor it produces with a bright and amber hue, containing a light honey sweetness, is the super enjoyment best close to Nature.

Tea Reviews 

Brewing tips:

The water used to steep this tea is about 90-95 degree Celsius depending on an individual's preference. Use the ratio of 1g to 50cc (or 1g to 25cc), the first infusion time of about 6 (or 3) minutes is recommended with more or less time depending on the desired concentration. As a rough guide, the higher the temperature of the water or the greater the number of leaves used, the shorter the steeping time should be. The tea leaves should be uncurled for full flavor. 

For ultimate enjoyment, a traditional Chinese Yixing teapot is recommended for loose oolong tea. The teapot should be half-filled with leaves and initially steeped for 15 seconds (depending on an individual's preference) with the steeping time increased by an additional 5 seconds for each successive steeping. The leaves may be steeped multiple times.

Payment: 

We accept PayPal only.  

Return Policy:

No returns are accepted on food items.

Customer Reviews

Based on 2 reviews
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K
KB
Another super consistent and delicious tea!

As I usually do with oolong, I tried this both with flash steeping and also with longer infusions. For the flash steeping I used a gaiwan and approximately 2g of leaf. I rinsed the leaves, and then began infusing using 45ml of hot, but not boiling, water, and an infusion time of 20 seconds. The liquor had golden amber colour from the first infusion, and the aroma was again, similar to a rock tea but also different, with a layer of sweetness.

The flavour was rich and complex, with honey sweetness but also warm roast notes like charcoal, woodiness, and minerals. The mouthfeel was rich, smooth yet somewhat astringent with a lingering aftertaste and leaving some salivation-inducing dryness on the back of the tongue and throat.

To me, the aftertaste was the standout feature of this tea, which carried on over all 8 infusions. I added 15 seconds with each infusion after the first, and found this tea impressively consistent until the very end. The only real detectable change was the slightest mellowing and sweetening over time with a reduction in astringency. This final infusion I allowed to sit for a lengthy several minutes, and it was an extremely smooth and satisfying finish.

Using my teapot method, I used 4g of leaf with 6oz of water for a more concentrated cup than I’d normally brew. It was well worth it however for the intensity of flavour. This tea is a real treat, and very well enjoyed with no added sweetener.

K
KB
Another super consistent and delicious tea!

As I usually do with oolong, I tried this both with flash steeping and also with longer infusions. For the flash steeping I used a gaiwan and approximately 2g of leaf. I rinsed the leaves, and then began infusing using 45ml of hot, but not boiling, water, and an infusion time of 20 seconds. The liquor had golden amber colour from the first infusion, and the aroma was again, similar to a rock tea but also different, with a layer of sweetness.

The flavour was rich and complex, with honey sweetness but also warm roast notes like charcoal, woodiness, and minerals. The mouthfeel was rich, smooth yet somewhat astringent with a lingering aftertaste and leaving some salivation-inducing dryness on the back of the tongue and throat.

To me, the aftertaste was the standout feature of this tea, which carried on over all 8 infusions. I added 15 seconds with each infusion after the first, and found this tea impressively consistent until the very end. The only real detectable change was the slightest mellowing and sweetening over time with a reduction in astringency. This final infusion I allowed to sit for a lengthy several minutes, and it was an extremely smooth and satisfying finish.

Using my teapot method, I used 4g of leaf with 6oz of water for a more concentrated cup than I’d normally brew. It was well worth it however for the intensity of flavour. This tea is a real treat, and very well enjoyed with no added sweetener.